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Gadgets,

The Super Nintendo Classic Edition Arrives With 21 Games on September 29

After the insanely successful NES Classic Edition completely sold out until Nintendoinexplicably stopped making it
, the company is following up with a miniature version of the Super Nintendo that will come bundled with 21 classic 16-bit games including
Super Mario World
and
F-Zero
.

According to a
tweet
on the official Nintendo of America Twitter account, the Super Nintendo Classic Edition will officially launch on September 29 and will also include games like
Star Fox 2
,
Donkey Kong Country
,
Super Mario Kart
,
The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past
and two wired controllers. Pricing details haven’t been revealed yet, but we’re hoping it falls somewhere near the $60 price point of the NES Classic Edition.

[
Twitter – Nintendo
]

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Gadgets,

How to Turn Your Smartphone Into an (Almost) Nintendo Switch

Image: Gadgetlayout

Nintendo’s questionable supply chain strategies mean there are still gamers trying to get their hands on a Switch, two months after its release. But why bother trying to hunt down another console when the smartphone in your pocket can already do almost everything the Switch can-with a few upgrades.

You probably occasionally use your smartphone as a portable gaming machine, although limited to just quick rounds of
Candy Crush
as you ride the subway every day. But a modern smartphone, with a beefy processor and a decent-sized display, can do almost everything the Nintendo Switch can (sadly
Breath of the Wild
will still be out of your reach).

In fact, your smartphone might actually offer a few upgrades over the Switch! There are far more games available, including emulators that let you play classic titles from almost any console. Though you’ll
need to put in a little effort
if you want to play old
Zelda
games on your iPhone.

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Besides games, your phone almost certainly offers a better visual experience than the Switch does. Nintendo chose to use an LCD display limited to a resolution of just 1280×720 pixels and many smartphones are capable of at least full 1920×1080 HD resolutions with color saturation and fidelity that far outperform the Switch’s screen.

But having access to thousands of great titles on a beautiful screen means nothing when trying to play action games using a touchscreen. Ask anyone who’s tried, it is an act of absolute frustration.

Controllers

So the first upgrade you’ll need to turn your smartphone into a Switch are some better controls. After all, touchscreens suck when it comes to playing games that require more than just tapping the screen. With the right accessories you can almost perfectly emulate the Switch’s handheld gaming experience, or connect multiple wireless controllers for some mobile multiplayer.

Switch Style Controllers

Gamevice Controller (iOS)

The closest you’ll get to recreating the Nintendo Switch’s form factor is the
$100 Gamevice
that wraps your smartphone in a pair of halved controllers featuring analog joysticks, a directional pad, and a set of four action buttons. You’ll at least need an iPhone 6 to use it, but it connects to the device’s Lightning port without the need for battery-sucking Bluetooth.

MOGA Ace Power Controller (iOS)

It’s essentially the same product as the Gamevice, but the
MOGA Ace Power
packs a rechargeable battery to help keep your smartphone running longer. You can find it online for as cheap as $20, but it’s only compatible with older iPhones. Anything larger than the iPhone 5s will be too big for the MOGA Ace Power to wrap around.

8Bitdo Zero Controller (iOS & Android)

The Switch’s two controllers handily slide off either end of the console to be used for multiplayer experiences, and if you want a similarly super tiny controller for your iOS or Android device than maybe you should consider the $17
8Bitdo Zero
. It works with any device that can wirelessly connect to Bluetooth peripherals and offers basic controls including shoulder buttons, a directional pad, and four action buttons.

Switch Pro Style Controllers


SteelSeries Stratus XL Controller (Android)


We’re a big fan of SteelSeries, so while the $60 the
SteelSeries Stratus XL
isn’t ideal for traveling, we still think it’s a good choice for when your smartphone’s connected to a TV for big-screen gaming. It’s not as cool as a Switch controller but its a comparable alternative to the Nintendo Switch’s Pro Controller. And while it doesn’t have any force feedback features, it does promise 40 hours of gameplay on a single pair of AA batteries.

SteelSeries Nimbus Controller (iOS)

The $50
SteelSeries Nimbus
wireless controller is the iOS equivalent of the company’s Stratus XL, giving you essentially the same experience as the full-size Nintendo Switch Pro Controller. With a few bonuses: It can be charged using the same Lightning cable you plug your iPhone into every night, and it features a dedicated menu button for navigating iOS or your Apple TV.

8Bitdo Wireless NES & SNES Controllers
(iOS & Android)

The Nintendo Switch will inevitably get access to the company’s Virtual Console, letting you play your favorite classic games. But with a smartphone running an emulator you can play them all now. And with 8Bitdo’s $35
NES
and
SNES Bluetooth controllers
, near-perfect recreations of the originals, you might feel like you’re back in your parent’s basement, slamming Capri Suns while playing
Super Mario World
.

Video Adapters

One of the Nintendo Switch’s most unique features is its ability to transform from a handheld gaming system to a part of your entertainment center so you can play your games on a big screen TV. The Switch relies on
a cumbersome dock
to do this, but there are more elegant ways to connect your smartphone to a TV, including going wireless.

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There are pros and cons to each approach, however, so you’ll need to decide what works best for you. Going wireless means you don’t have to deal with your smartphone being tethered to a long HDMI cable. But it might mean some costly hardware upgrades if you don’t already have a reliable wireless network in your home, or a TV setup that facilitates streaming from a mobile device.

Using a video adapter physically connected to your TV means you’ll have to wrangle HDMI and charging cables while you play. Yet it also guarantees smooth frame rates at all times, and the ability to enjoy your games on a friend’s TV, or a TV in a hotel room, where you can’t easily connect to a reliable (or secure) wireless network.

The Wireless Options

Apple TV (iOS)

If you want to wirelessly connect your iPhone to your TV using AirPlay, the
Apple TV
is your easiest solution. However, at $149 it’s half the price of a Nintendo Switch, and you’ll need to ensure your wireless router is up to the task of streaming video to your TV without dropping frames, which can ruin the gaming experience.

Google Chromecast (Android)

Chromcast can with iPhones games streamed to the TV too, but the experience isn’t always pleasant. Yet, for mirroring the gaming action on your Android smartphone to a TV, using a Google Chromecast is the way to go. Its small and unobtrusive and is only $35. That’s a downright bargain-as long as you can live with resolutions that top out at 1920×1080 HD.

Google Chromecast Ultra (Android)

Can the Nintendo Switch do 4K? Nope. But your Android smartphone probably can when connected to your TV via the Google Chromecast Plus. It goes $69-just ten dollars more than a Switch game, and it has an ethernet port for connecting directly to your router. That should help take some of the load off of your wireless network to ensure solid frame rates when streaming your favorite games.

The Wired Options

Apple Lightning Digital AV Adapter
(iOS)

Reliable wired options for iOS devices are few and far between. If you’re using an iPhone your best bet is to shell out a few more bucks to Apple and buy the
$49 official Lightning to HDMI adapter
. Fortunately it also includes an additional USB-C port so you can power your device while it’s connected to a TV using its Lightning port.

Slimport MicroUSB to HDMI Adapter (Android)

If you’re using an older Android device that doesn’t have a USB-C connection, you’ll need this
Slimport microUSB to HDMI adapter
. You probably won’t be able to push 4K resolution games to your TV, but at $7 it’s a cheap and compact solution.

Apple USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter (Android)

The iPhone doesn’t support USB-C just yet, but most of the Android smartphones released in the past year do. As do many laptops. So Apple’s
USB-C to HDMI adapter might be worth the $69
investment. When you’re not using it to connect an Android smartphone to your TV for gaming, it also has a USB-A port for connecting older peripherals to your fancy new laptop.

Monoprice USB-C to HDMI & USB-C Dual Port Adapter (Android)

If you’d rather not pay a premium for Apple’s products (that’s fair), and only ever intend to use your adapter with a smartphone,
Monoprice’s USB-C solution
gives you the important basics, including an HDMI port, and an extra USB-C port for charging, for just $20.

Games

This is where your makeshift smartphone Switch can run laps around Nintendo’s console-at least in terms of selection. At the moment, the best reasons to buy a Nintendo Switch are
Zelda: Breath of the Wild
, and
Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
. That’s

just
two
games
.
They both happen to be very
good
games, but the iTunes App Store and the Google Play store both have thousands of titles you can download, and plenty that are actually good.

But which platform offers the better gaming experience? Apple’s walled garden approach to its app store means you’re less likely to get fooled buying a knock-off game. Its MFi certification program also ensures that if a controller says ‘Made for iPhone’ on the packaging, it’s guaranteed to connect and work with your phone right out of the box. Not all
iOS games will work with a MFi-approved controller
, however, and using a generic Bluetooth gamepad with your iPhone is hit and miss.

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Android smartphones, on the other hand, have access to the Google Play store, which is like the wild west when it comes to content. Anything and everything goes, and you can probably find exactly what you need if you know where to look. That includes games, apps for remapping the buttons on a Bluetooth controller so it works flawlessly with any title, and emulators.

Part of the appeal of recent Nintendo consoles has been the company’s Virtual Console which allows you to play classic NES, SNES, and Game Boy games on modern hardware. But with the
right emulator
, Android smartphones can play classic games from countless different consoles, including the Atari 2600, Playstation, Game Boy Advance, PSP, PS2, and
even the Game Cube
. As for finding those games (commonly referred to as ROMs) that’s between you and a strategic Google search.

Can you play games like
Zelda: Breath of the Wild
or
Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
on your smartphone yet? No. So the Nintendo Switch will always be able to hold that over your smartphone FrankenSwitch. But you just saved yourself $300+, and having to wait in yet another line hoping that Best Buy has restocked enough of them.

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Gadgets,

Mad Genius Brings Flappy Bird Back From the Dead on Dreamcast Memory Card

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As Sega’s Hail Mary pass on hardware, the
Dreamcast
wasn’t exactly the miracle the company prayed for. But the long-dead console still has a massive fanbase, as a clever hacker who managed to

port the infinitely addictive
Flappy Bird
to the Dreamcast’s interactive memory card

recently demonstrated.

The VMU, or Visual Memory Unit, was an oversized memory card that plugged into the Dreamcast’s controllers to store game data, or serve as a second-screen for some games using its built-in monochrome LCD display. The VMU also featured basic controls, and could be used as a portable gaming device if you refused to just buy a Game Boy.

Dmitry Grinberg’s hack of the Dreamcast VMU includes developing an ARM chip emulator for the tiny, under-powered gaming device, allowing it to run the (
infamously discontinued
) mobile game
Flappy Bird
-very, very slowly. You might assume the game would be much easier running in slow motion, but the controls are equally unresponsive, as this video of Grinberg failing to get past the first obstacle demonstrates.

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If it were solely up to their creators, both the Dreamcast and
Flappy Bird
would have likely gone the way of the dinosaurs. But fans, like life, always find a way.

[
YouTube
via
Hackaday
]



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Gadgets,

This SNES-Style Nintendo Switch Controller Is Designed to Play 32 Years of Games

Nintendo’s recently-announced
classic games service
will eventually bring your favorite 8-bit and 16-bit titles to the
Switch
. And when it finally launches, 8Bitdo’s new SNES30 Pro controller looks like it could be the perfect way to play everything from the original NES’
Super Mario Bros.
, to the Switch’s
Zelda: Breath of the Wild
.

Based on the curvy design of the Super Nintendo controller, the SNES30 Pro has the familiar directional pad on its left side, with Y, X, B, and A buttons on the right. But it adds a pair of analog joysticks to the mix, positioned similar to where you’d find them on the Playstation’s DualShock controller, as well as additional shoulder buttons to match what the Switch’s Joy-Con controllers can do, and a USB-C charging port.

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The SNES30 Pro also rumbles, and has a gyroscope inside so it can be used with motion-controlled features in games, such as aiming the bow and arrow in
Breath of the Wild
. It’s not Switch-only, however. Using Bluetooth you can connect it to Windows PCs, Macs, and Android mobile devices.

Available closer to the holidays, there are no pricing details for the SNES30 Pro just yet, but it will presumably be cheaper than the expensive $70 Switch Pro Controller given what
previous 8Bitdo controllers go for
.

[
8Bitdo
]

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Gadgets,

Microsoft unveils the Surface Laptop powered by Windows 10 S, should Google be afraid?

Microsoft started off with the vision of putting a PC on every desk, then on every house and in every pocket. Today, at the
#
MicrosoftEdu
event in New York, Microsoft announced its plans to place PC
‘s
in every classroom. Microsoft unveiled Windows 10 S, a new version of Windows 10 which is stripped down and simplified to run on low-end hardware used specifically in classrooms.

S is for security, for simplicity and superior performance. It also stems from the soul of today’s Windows bringing the most essential elements of the operating system and streamlining it for use in classrooms.

Everything that runs on WIndows 10 S is downloaded from the Windows Store,” said Executive Vice President, Terry Myerson. Which means that the apps that run on Windows 10 S
are
not only secure but also streamlined to run on low-powered devices and verified by Microsoft for security, so that it is just as fast as when a student logs in at the first day of school to the last day.

Additionally, Microsoft has also streamlined the login process in Windows 10 S. Microsoft knows the hassles school administrators face when setting up hundreds of PCs for students. Windows 10 S comes with a Set
up
My PC app that turbocharges the time of the setup process to less than 30 seconds. The admin can also control the features students have access to
,
remotely.

The PC comes of age with the Microsoft Surface Studio

Microsoft started off with the vision of putting a PC on every desk, then on every house and in every pocket. Today, at the #MicrosoftEdu event in New York, Microsoft announced its plans to place PC’s in every classroom. Microsoft unveiled Windows 10 S, a new version of Windows 10 which is stripped down and simplified to run on low-end hardware used specifically in classrooms.

To bring Windows 10 S to students, Microsoft has teamed up with OEMs like Acer, Asus, Samsung, Toshiba, HP and more to offer notebooks running Windows 10 S for as low as $189
(
roughly Rs 12,128). Microsoft is offering Windows 10 S for free to all school
s
w
ho
are running Windows 10 Pro. The company is also providing a free one year subscription to Minecraft: Education Edition and Office 365 Education with Microsoft Teams.

But then, Microsoft was not quite satisfied with just introducing a new version of Windows. Panos Panay, Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President took the veils off the Surface Laptop. Available in four colours- Platinum, Burgundy, Cobalt Blue, and Graphite Gold, the Surface Laptop weighs 1.25 kg and is just 14.5mm thin at its thickest. The laptop can be opened with one finger and out pops a 13.5-inch PixelSense Display with 3:2 aspect ratio, which as Panay claims is the thinnest LCD touch
panel
ever created and put into a laptop. It has 3.4 million pixels with high contrast and
a
colour coordinated screen. It also supports the Surface Pen allowing students to draw on the screen like all other Surface devices.


The device is powered by Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors, 1TB of storage and a whopping 14.5 hours of battery life. Panay claimed it is the thinnest and the fastest i7 laptop out there, even faster and thinner than the i7 Macbook Pro and
has

M
ore battery life than any MacBook Air on the market today.

There are integrated vapour chambers into the aluminium chassis on the rear of the device which keeps the Surface Laptop cool. The speakers are integrated underneath the keyboard and the keyboard itself is laser etched with
a

1.5 mm key travel. The Surface Laptop also supports the Surface Dial that was introduced with the
Surface Studio
last year and can be used to contextually control apps.

The i5 variant of the Surface Laptop will be available for pre-orders in the US from today for $999 with 4GB of RAM and 128GB of SSD storage. The device will start shipping from June 15th.

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Gadgets,

Sennheiser HE-1: The headphones god and Jimi Hendrix rock out in the heavens

I am sitting in this room on the 13th floor of the St.Regis hotel in Mumbai overlooking the concrete jungle the financial capital of India has become. Alongside me is Andreas Sennheiser, co-CEO and chief scion of the legendary german audio company and he has what some people would say the equivalent of a Rolls Royce for audio with him. Sennheiser, was in India showcasing the legendary audio marker’s latest achievement — the HE-1 headphone which the company claims is soulfully the next generation of its iconic Orpheus headphone. In the 15 short and sweet minutes I tested these headphones, my worldview of audio has been changed forever; and unfortunately for me it is something I may never be able to recreate at home considering the astronomical Rs 45 lakh price point of the HE-1, but then that’s what dreams are made of.

While Rs 45 lakh goes beyond one would call ostentatious, particularly for a headphone, there is this silken gratification in the fact there is a company in the technology industry which is just focussed on pushing the boundaries, maxing them out knowing fully well that it will not be selling even in the 1000s. And this is about pushing the boundaries of what kind of sonics one can expect from a headphone. This investment I’m sure will trickle down in multiple generations of Sennheiser products.

Rich sound just got literal with the Sennheiser HE 1 worth Rs 45 lakhs

I am sitting in this room on the 13th floor of the St.Regis hotel in Mumbai overlooking the concrete jungle the financial capital of India has become. Alongside me is Andreas Sennheiser, co-CEO and chief scion of the legendary german audio company and he has what some people would say the equivalent of a Rolls Royce for audio with him. Sennheiser, was in India showcasing the legendary audio marker’s latest achievement — the HE-1 headphone which the company claims is soulfully the next generation of its iconic Orpheus headphone. In the 15 short and sweet minutes I tested these headphones, my worldview of audio has been changed forever; and unfortunately for me it is something I may never be able to recreate at home considering the astronomical Rs 45 lakh price point of the HE-1, but then that’s what dreams are made of.

But let me come down to basics. This is a tube powered headphone system. It is what Sennheiser calls an electrostatic headphone system with a 500v tube amplifier — it has custom JJ tubes, additionally it comes with two stage amplification. Sennheiser claims that you’d hear things in a song that you’d never hear before and boy they are bang on.

In fact, the team told me that they showcased the headphones to a number of Indian artists like Loy Mendosa, Papon and the likes and all of them were wowed by the sound quality of the HE-1.

In my session which lasted a total of 15 minutes included an acoustic piece featuring a cello, violins, an acoustic guitar; basically an orchestra. This was the ‘aha’ moment I had never experienced in my life. The moment the song started playing I was agitated and wondered where the sound was coming from. It was directional of course, it just didn’t seem like I was wearing headphones. It sounded so natural. It was quite enthralling.

The second song was the iconic live acoustic rendition of the Eagles classic
Hotel California
and it sounded astoundingly good. Everything from the highs and mids to the low-end frequencies were audible crystal clear, but that was a given. What was more interesting was that the sound of the crowd was natural. I could individually pick out different sounds, which I have never experienced with any headphone system including Sennheiser’s HD800 line which is meant for mastering records.

I Listened to Sennheiser’s Absurd $55,000 Orpheus Headphones

I am sitting in this room on the 13th floor of the St.Regis hotel in Mumbai overlooking the concrete jungle the financial capital of India has become. Alongside me is Andreas Sennheiser, co-CEO and chief scion of the legendary german audio company and he has what some people would say the equivalent of a Rolls Royce for audio with him. Sennheiser, was in India showcasing the legendary audio marker’s latest achievement — the HE-1 headphone which the company claims is soulfully the next generation of its iconic Orpheus headphone. In the 15 short and sweet minutes I tested these headphones, my worldview of audio has been changed forever; and unfortunately for me it is something I may never be able to recreate at home considering the astronomical Rs 45 lakh price point of the HE-1, but then that’s what dreams are made of.

Last song was Michael Jackson’s iconic
Thriller
and this was perhaps the most intriguing experience of all. While I was able to listen to new elements in the mix, I could make out the quack and the peppy sound of Steve Lukather’s guitar. Jackson’s vocals sounded more supple in the mix and sat right in the middle allowing all instruments to breathe. I could even make out which pickup Lukhather had used on different passages of the song. This was fascinating as I had heard the very song on the AKG Quincy Jones headphones a couple of days earlier. Quincy Jones was Jackson’s producer for the album and his signature line of AKG headphones are amongst the very best around and the HE-1 steamrolled it in terms of sonic rendition of the song; that’s no mean feat, but at Rs 45 lakhs, it is only meant for hyper obsessive audiophiles, connoisseurs and well, people with spare kidneys.

At the end of the day, my conclusion is short and simple. My favourite guitarist of all time is Jimi Hendrix and I dearly hope someone, somehow hands him one of these bad boys in the heavens because he deserves to rock out to
Voodoo Child
with the almighty up there wearing these.

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Gadgets,

An Incredible Camcorder Tour of the Gadgets That Made Nerds Drool in 1987

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GIF:
YouTube

Fifty years ago the first
Consumer Electronics Show
was held in New York City, giving local nerds a sneak peek at all the electronic toys arriving in 1967. Twenty years later,
Art Vuolo
attended the ‘Summer’ edition of the trade show with a giant camera on his shoulder, giving us a wonderful time capsule of what was drool-worthy 30 years ago.



Up until 1994, CES actually happened twice a year. Once in Las Vegas in January-the
CES Gadgetlayout knows best
-and a second time in Chicago in June. The Summer edition, as it was known, is where all of this fantastic footage comes from, and while all of the technology looks incredibly dated, we’ll be saying the same thing about this year’s CES 30 years from now.



The
four-part video series
covers everything from super-VHS cameras and tape recorders, to monstrous CRT television sets, to CD video players. Part four is undoubtedly our favorite as it not only features an incredibly cheesy electronic synth guitar from Casio, but also horribly creepy videos, and a peek at the future of home communications: video phones.



Surprisingly, videophones actually pop up a couple of times in this video series, but unsurprisingly people didn’t want to have to hunch down in front of their landline phones to chat with friends on a tiny screen. The technology would need at least another 20 years or so, with the arrival of smartphones, for it to become as ubiquitous as it is today.



[
YouTube
via
The Awesomer
]

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Gadgets, Reviews,

I Tried the Most Futuristic Car Dashboard You Can Buy

All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gadgetlayout

We all know we’re supposed to ignore our smartphones while driving. Yet somehow it’s OK to take our eyes off the road to glance at some kind of GPS unit?
Navdy is one of the first GPS device
s
 
that claims to be safer for drivers by putting the map and other info front and center so your eyes stay on the road-it’s also one of the most comprehensive in-car navigation devices on the market.

First revealed way back in 2014
, the $500 Navdy’s approach to reducing distracted driving isn’t just about putting a translucent screen right in front of a driver-if that’s all you need,
Garmin’s $150 HUD
has you covered. It also vastly improves and simplifies the clumsy and confusing interfaces that have plagued GPS devices since they first showed up in cars. And because some drivers simply can’t ignore their phones, even for just 10 minutes while you drive to the store, Navdy puts all your phone notifications on the screen alongside the map.

Installing the Navdy hardware isn’t as easy as installing a touchscreen GPS device that simply suction cups to the windshield. It’s crucial to perfectly position the Navdy display unit on the dashboard, which requires some frustrating trial and error.

You’ll need access to your car’s ODB-II port to install the Navdy hardware. If it’s not easily accessible, installation will be difficult.

The first step to installing Navdy is connecting it to your car’s (in my case, a Dodge Grand Caravan) ODB-II port. Usually found underneath the dashboard, mechanics use this port to quickly diagnose problems, and nearly every car made in the last 20 years has one. Mine was completely exposed and easy to get to, but it could be harder to located on other cars, so it’s a good idea to hunt for yours first.

This unsightly wire running across your dashboard is definitely one of the downsides of installing Navdy.

In addition to giving it access to vehicle data like speed and gas usage, the ODB-II port also powers the Navdy hardware. The downside to that is you’ll have to learn to live with a wire running across your dashboard at all times. The installation kit includes a series of clips that ensure the wire stays out of the way, but Navdy will always look like an aftermarket upgrade unless you’re willing to pull up panels and properly hide the wires.

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It took me about 20 minutes to position (and re-position, repeatedly) everything perfectly, as the installation instructions require the Navdy’s UI to appear as if it’s floating just above where your vehicle’s hood meets the road.

When you’re sitting behind the wheel, the Navdy’s map and UI fills its entire, six-inch wide see-through display.

Once the hassle of installation is done, you’re left with a useful display that’s so subtle it’s actually hard to photograph. The roughly 6-inch clear plastic panel reflects a high-contrast image from a tiny projector that’s reminiscent of the futuristic helmet HUDs that fighter pilots rely on. It automatically adjusts its brightness based on the ambient lighting in and around your car, so even when you’re staring at a bright sunlit road ahead, the UI never gets washed out.

Navdy is reminiscent of old-school TVs which bounced an image onto a larger screen using a projector.

Because the Navdy uses a tiny projector, you will still see those weird color shifts when you look away and quickly move your eyes across the screen, which can be annoying. The Navdy screen also has a very specific viewing angle, so once the hardware is aligned and installed on your dashboard, you’re not going to want to drastically adjust the angle or height of the driver’s seat, or shift around too much while you drive.

In addition to a live map, Navdy can also display a customizable dashboard so you can monitor your speed without having to look down.

The Navdy hardware shows your current position at all times using built-in GPS and offline map data sourced from
HERE
, but it can also switch to a virtual dashboard that can be customized with important details like your current speed and gas level.

Some functionality you’ll normally find in a GPS device is passed off to the Navdy app to help simplify its user interface.

But to take full advantage of Navdy’s features, you need to wirelessly connect it to your phone. This adds turn-by-turn directions and traffic data (via Google Maps), the ability to control and play music, access to customizable notifications, and even the ability to trigger your phone’s smart assistant.

Navdy includes a scroll wheel that straps to your steering wheel, making it easy to navigate the user interface without having to look away.

A smartphone might be essential to accessing Navdy’s best features, but the hardware also manages to stay relatively hands-free. A small scroll wheel with a center button easily attaches to your steering wheel for quick navigation. Powered by a coin battery, it wirelessly connects to Navdy and is intuitive to use-though having it always attached to your steering wheel takes some getting used to (I kept hitting it with my fingers while making turns).

A camera on Navdy, constantly staring back at you, lets the hardware recognize simple hand gestures for dismissing notifications.

You can also navigate Navdy’s UI with simple hand gestures. A camera on the front of the device can detect when you’re waving your hand in front of it, letting you quickly dismiss or read notifications. It’s a great concept, but unfortunately, it was a little hit and miss during my testing. I often had to place my hand close to the camera and wave very deliberately for the gestures to be detected, which kind of defeats the purpose of a hands-free feature.

You’ll want to give yourself some time to get used to Navdy’s floating display, as it can itself be a distraction at first.

Unless you’re a fighter pilot who’s used to having a HUD in your face all day, Navdy’s unique see-through screen takes some getting used to. Eventually you’ll learn to occasionally glance down at it for directions, or to check your speed, but during the first week of testing I found myself constantly looking down at Navdy’s novel floating display, and that took my eyes off the road ahead. Did I crash the car? No. But the whole point of the Navdy is to help reduce distracted driving, and it only does that after the novelty has worn off.

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Do you need to spend $500 on a hands-free navigation device when more traditional touchscreen GPS units can be had for around $100? If you only occasionally have a need for a dedicated sat-nav, like while traveling, you’ll be just fine with a cheaper Garmin. But if you rely on your navigation device every day, Navdy provides an all-around better experience. Most sat-nav UIs are notoriously archaic, but the Navdy app and software are extremely polished with frequent updates, and having Google Maps’ traffic data on-screen at all times turned out to be a feature I can no longer live without.

And if you want to live out your
Top Gun
fighter pilot fantasies on your drive to and from work every day, Navdy’s always visible dashboard-mounted display will save you from having to enlist in the Navy.

README

  • The first GPS navigation device that genuinely lets you keep your eyes on the road at all times (and feel like a fighter pilot). But you will have to train yourself not to stare at it all the time.
  • Installation isn’t complicated, but it is time-consuming. And once installed it will always look like an aftermarket upgrade.
  • To access Navdy’s best features you’ll need to use it with a smartphone and an app.
  • Using the steering wheel scroll wheel to navigate Navdy’s streamlined UI is very intuitive and natural.
  • Some common navigation functions are only accessible via the Navdy app, making them inaccessible while driving.
  • Map data is updated on a quarterly basis every year, and you can swap in offline maps for other areas of the world as needed.
  • At $500, it’s one of the most expensive GPS devices you can buy for a car.
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Gadgets,

I Can’t Wait to Play This Nintendo Switch Battery

The Nintendo Switch is a tiny console with tiny controllers all powered by tiny batteries with tiny capacities. Charging is just part of life with the Switch, which is why it’s spawned hundreds of power accessories, including this
portable battery
that looks like the most boring Switch game you can play.

But while Bionik’s Power Plate looks like a smaller version of the console, with only half a screen, it’s actually a 4,500 mAh rechargeable battery with a built-in black and white LCD display showing what devices are currently being charged.

The Switch’s Joy-Con controllers can attach to either side of the Power Plate and be recharged three times over, letting you continue to play games with them while the console is connected to a TV. Or you can connect the Switch itself to the Power Plate via a USB-C cable and top off its own internal battery, but just once, given how power hungry the portable console is.

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The $50 battery is available now, and probably not as fun to play as

Breath of the Wild
.

[
Bionik
]

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Gadgets,

Rich sound just got literal with the Sennheiser HE 1 worth Rs 45 lakhs

How deep
do you dwelve into the depths of
your pocket to experience unparalleled sound quality from a pair of headphones? Well, if you have Rs 45 lakhs lying around, you may consider owning the Sennheiser HE1, the successor to the
legendary Orpheus headphones
. The HE1 is an aural miracle. It combines a unique amplifier concept with meticulously selected materials and superior craftsmanship.


“No other sound reproduction system in the world is able to deceive our senses like the HE 1. It creates the absolutely perfect illusion of being directly immersed in the sound,” said Daniel Sennheiser, describing the audio experience,” Daniel Sennheiser, Sennheiser CEO said about the audio experience.

Sennheiser’s Built Probably the World’s Best Headphones-But They Cost $55,000

How deep do you dwelve into the depths of your pocket to experience unparalleled sound quality from a pair of headphones? Well, if you have Rs 45 lakhs lying around, you may consider owning the Sennheiser HE1, the successor to the legendary Orpheus headphones. The HE1 is an aural miracle. It combines a unique amplifier concept with meticulously selected materials and superior craftsmanship.




The new HE1 uses a completely new amplifier concept that combines the superior impulse processing of a tube amplifier with the low distortion of a transistor amplifier to perfection. The experience begins even before you start listening. Once the switch is flicked on, the controls at the front extend slowly from the amplifier housing, while the vacuum tubes with their quartz glass bulbs rise from the base and start to glow. Lastly, a glass cover is automatically raised for you to remove the headphones and put it over your head.



At its heart, the amplifier has eight vacuum tubes to process the incoming signal. Vacuum tubes has the advantage of superior impulse processing but also have high sensitivity to air-borne noise. To eliminate this, the HE 1 amp was crafted from granular, homogeneous Carrara marble. It is also freely suspended.

The decoupling of the tubes in combination with the damping properties of the marble has the effect of reducing structure-borne noise to an absolute minimum. tubes themselves also have a high-quality patent-pending enclosure consisting of quartz-glass bulbs that perfectly shield them from their surroundings.

The headphone has a frequency response of 8 hertz to more than 100 kilohertz ensuring that in an audible range, the sound is virtually free of distortion.

“To craft a successor to the legendary Orpheus as a reference product for the industry itself, Sennheiser worked tirelessly on innovative technical solutions, consistently putting previously used acoustics approaches to the test and exploiting every conceivable possibility when it came to selecting the optimum materials. For almost a decade, a core team of developers, engineers and designers dedicated themselves to producing a successor, and they have now created a headphone system that is beyond comparison. We are very proud of this exceptional product for the benchmark for the Indian market. The HE 1 stands for the innovative capabilities of our company and the joint commitment of our workforce to the pursuit of perfect sound,” Dr Andreas Sennheiser, CEO of Sennheiser said in a statement.

The Most Intense Ear Buds Sennheiser Has Ever Made

How deep do you dwelve into the depths of your pocket to experience unparalleled sound quality from a pair of headphones? Well, if you have Rs 45 lakhs lying around, you may consider owning the Sennheiser HE1, the successor to the legendary Orpheus headphones. The HE1 is an aural miracle. It combines a unique amplifier concept with meticulously selected materials and superior craftsmanship.



The tube amplifier of the new HE 1 comes with a tube amplifier stage that is directly integrated into the cups of the headphones. The result is a 200 per cent rise in efficiency in power as compared to other audiophile equipment. In electrostatic headphones, most of the amplifier power is lost in the cable between the headphones and the tube amplifier. Only around one third of the power generated is used to produce sound waves, Sennheiser’s approach was therefore to amplify the alternating voltage to high voltages not at the beginning of the cable but at the point where it is required


directly at the gold-vaporised ceramic electrodes in the headphones themselves.

The headphone is available through a concierge service by phone
(
(+ 49 69 89 91 47 95) or by filling out a

form

.